Dynamic Duo Reign At Arnold Sports Festival

Brooklyn Center residents, Mark and Sarah Wurdeman, placed first and/or second in every event that they competed in during the Arnold Sports Festival 2018 held in Columbus, OH.

The international event hosted several hundred competitors in over 40 martial arts divisions. Mark and Sarah, students in Taekwondo (Korean Karate) and Haidong Gumdo (Korean sword) at White Tiger Martial Arts, headquartered in Fridley. Both are senior students and instructors there.

Mark placed first in all four divisions that he competed – Tang Soo Do forms, Traditional Taekwondo forms, Weapons and Target cutting. Sarah had the misfortune of competing against Mark in three of the four divisions and against black belt ladies in another. Sarah will test for her black belt in Taekwondo in May 2018.

White Tiger Martial Arts focuses on the personal development of each student and uses tournaments as a way to challenge knowledge/understanding plus provide an opportunity to spend time with like-minded martial artists.

For more information about where Mark and Sarah train, please check the website – wtma-mn.com. Thank you.

Glory Days

Don’t live in the past! Well, that’s actually what I hear when I listen to Bruce Springsteen’s song with that title. It struck me a few years back, at least a decade, when I attended a high school reunion. While we having the main dinner event, a couple classmates (who aren’t too bad about this idea) mentioned moments of our athletic careers. “Do you remember [blank] game?” “Do you remember when [blank] messed up that play/” Now, I was IN those games and I couldn’t recall anything they were talking about. Pretty sad? I don’t think so. I do remember the work and fun that we had during those times. I also remember being teenagers trying to figure out how handle growing up.

Now, it isn’t bad that they remember this stuff! The problem starts when that’s ALL someone talks about. It is pretty sad that your high school days were the best part of your life. That means you have ignored or chosen not to build anything new. I say this from having only been a mediocre athlete who enjoyed playing the games without the illusion of college scholarships and professional sports. I do remember (outside varsity athletics) intentionally picking the worst possible partner and still winning the games that we played. It was about “playing” a game for the fun of playing, learning, and growing.

Box of things earned.

It’s now 38 years past high school (WOW! I’m old!), and I still need to decide what I want to be when I grow up. Well…not really. I’ve collected the credentials for the martial arts career that I’ve chose. I have even agreed to a “Look at me” wall in our school. The difference that I see is that these are accomplished goals and NOT just awards or trophies. The originals stay in the box at home but showing my achievements is probably good business.

Regardless, my continued training and education IS for me. That I can benefit students coming after me is just that, a benefit. When I have students 10 and 20 years older than me as inspiration, yet they look to me on how to do techniques. how can I NOT be moved to keep going forward?

Living in the past holds you back from all you can achieve! Moving forward is the greatest challenge! What will you be courageous enough about to commit to? All of those who travel the Hero’s Journey must face themselves and their past in order to move forward and become the Hero. Are you willing to work that hard?

1+1=3

That’s close enough, right?

That was the question I asked a student last night. When I did, I got this really funny look including a wrinkled up nose and a rather emphatic “No!” So, I asked “Why not?” The response to that was “Because it’s not right.”

Where is this going? Well, it started back in the middle of that particular class, when I asked the same student if they had done their form with their best techniques. Did you do your best stances? Did you do your best kicks? Did you do your best blocks and strikes? The answer to each was “No.” I left the student with one last question – “Why not?”

Today in class I had another student was dragging things a bit. I asked the math question again and received the same type of response. Since it was earlier in the class, I took a few moments to expand on the idea.

If you don’t agree that 1+1=3, then you choose to do that work right. Yet, if you don’t keep your physical techniques correct, you are choosing to do them wrong. Right and wrong shouldn’t be something that is turned on and off. It should be a constant.

This leads to how many choices that you actually make in a day, even younglngs. What clothes are worn…which is very evident that boys may not care…is just an example. Books read, the type of video games, getting homework done [correctly] are just examples of choices made everyday by younglings. The evident actions of this show up in class when the student spends more time talking than working on material, does techniques mostly, or asking irrelevant questions.

It is truly unfortunate that we pass through each day not realizing the many choices and decisions that we make plus how they affect our lives in training, career, school, and relationships of all kinds. Knowing what work and effort that you’re willing to put forth will help you achieve all of you goals plus find the support to achieve more! Just as you should be careful of what you wish for, you should be careful of what you choose.

Integrity

Box of things earned.

Over the past couple years, I’ve learned more about the poor behavior within the martial arts than I ever wanted to know! I’ve had my own horror story of being homeless after believing that I was going to become part of an organization that would lead toward a huge goal that I had. I also watched as that person/group tried to convince seniors of the Kwan that they would fulfill those goals…even after a 10 year federal prison term.

These experiences have made me skeptical as many high rank people start talking about what they have planned. I now watch much closer and listen more. This has led me to learn that there’s a whole group that…

1) delays submitting Dan applications to the Kukkiwon for 10 months to over a year, 2) schedules testing at random intervals with unspecified requirements for Dan – Black Belt – testing, 3) charges anywhere from $600 to $10,000 for Dan testing.

These are sad examples of what happens in an unregulated industry. How do you know what is a good school? How can you believe that you and/or your child(ren) will get a proper martial arts education? These are samples of the questions that you won’t know until after you start training. Yes, sadly, you will have to join a class for a while and attempt to become part of their family before you truly find out if you belong there.

Here are a couple ideas on how to help you figure things out before you get in too deep. Things to ask about are…

  1. If the school can’t tell you about who their current teacher is and where (s)he trained plus who their teacher was and their teacher’s teacher was.
  2. If the school talks contracts for certain levels before they even let you try a class.
  3. If the school doesn’t have a schedule for training and testing.
  4. If the school doesn’t list it’s tuition and test fees.

Those are just things off the top of my head. There is SO much that can be tainted in a martial arts school that hurt the student trying to learn and the family finances. It is here where anyone not training but thinking about it has the chance to keep these schools honest. One of the key principles of training in the martial arts, Taekwondo in particular, is that of Integrity. If the schools and their teachers can’t answer questions honestly, how can they teach integrity to you and your child? If the school owners and teachers answer “I don’t know.” to questions asked, then you may not want to be there!

That’s Why There’s A Team!

Rene: “I just–I screwed up. You know, Oliver was right to kick me off the team.”
Dinah: “You were in an impossible position.”
Curtis: “Yeah, and when you’re in an impossible position, that’s why there’s a team, D.
Just like Dig said.”
— Arrow (6×09): Irreconcilable Differences

So, this was going to go the way of superheroes with leadership and teamwork but a closer reference has shown itself. I knew somewhere along the line there would be the opportunity to comment with pride about my student’s creation called “push-up club.”

When a group of students were preparing for their Haidong Gumdo, Korean sword, black belt test, they realized that they had push-ups to do as a portion of the test. What do good responsible students do in this situation? They get together at the end of class and do push-ups. Most only did what would be required for the test, but they were there doing them,

Now, at the time none were looking at how doing push-ups as a group was building our team further. They weren’t looking at becoming a leader within the school, either. They just did the work that they knew needed to be done. The several students with military experience have commented that push-ups have always been done to build teams. Even recently, watching an episode of Miami SWAT on Netflix, not my choice, the 22 team all joined in with the probie to do push-ups, which were caused by messing up his assignment. This is done to help drive the point that the team does together always, plus that the team is more important than the individual.

I agree with this concept, though, I don’t believe that it truly develops a stronger team when it is pretty much expected to do. Someone not wanting to do the push-ups would be seen as not part of the team, so it is kind of a false development of the team. Why do I believe this way? That’s a really good question.

The real reason for my stance on this is illustrated by how push-up club has evolved. Back in October 2016, in the middle of their wedding reception, the bride and groom and fellow students had push-up club. Moving forward to May 2017, another wedding reception where students married had push-up club while the DJ played YMCA (yes, it was a Star Wars theme). The third comes from a random evening out socializing with friends and push-up club erupts.

In all of these illustrations, push-up club happened because all there CHOSE to join in. This is truly how push-ups build teams and leaders. All those who choose to do the work benefit from the group’s work and growth. I’ve said it many times and will probably say it many more…I’ve got awesome students!

Do what Works – Guest Post by Bill Hedrick

Do what Works

I was originally going to title this: “Don’t try new things,” But of course that would send the wrong message.

When I was a kitchen designer my biggest problem is that I didn’t want to do things the same way. If I found a good way to solve a design problem, I would use it once or twice and try something new. Most often this resulted in failure. I coined a saying, “There are many new bad ideas, there are few new good ideas.” Recently, it came back to me in Gumdo class. We were doing “Zombie drills,” where a zombie would come at you doing straight cuts and you had to block or avoid them. I found a good way that worked for me and couldn’t stick to it. Several of my classmates had the same issue, we would try something flashier after using a technique that worked. Master F. observed that “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

Do techniques that work! I saw this in action at Northwoods Conquest, in the youth weapons division. The winner did Ssangsu 5 and 7 (sword forms) in combinaton and nailed it. Another competitor tried a mashup of a stationary cutting drill, a bit of one sword form and a couple moves from another form. He got lost somewhere along the way and quit. Another competitor tried to do Ssangsu 3, got lost somewhere in the middle and butchered the end. He used a kagum, metal training sword, for the put away and ended up grabbing the blade, had it been sharp there would have been literal butchery. Another student simply did a good Ssangsu 1 and earned a medal. He did what worked. In competition you need to stick with what works for you. Stretching your limits should be done in training, not in competition.